Sep 21, 2007

Watership Down

by Richard Adams

Although Watership Down is peopled by rabbits, the story is quite serious. It is an epic tale of leadership and adventure: a small group of rabbits escapes a warren doomed for destruction and flees through the countryside seeking a safe place to make a new home. It is full of unforgettable characters, drama, tall tales, humor, sorrow and warfare. The rabbits face dangers on all sides, from men, foxes, dogs and even established rabbits in other warrens who don't welcome newcomers. They show strength I never thought of rabbits having-- I used to see them as being weak and uninteresting (before I read this book). The author gives close attention to environment details so that the natural setting is easily painted in the reader's mind. The animals' behavior is accurately based on observations of wild rabbits, and is quite realistic. If you can accept the fact that these animals talk, you get drawn into their culture and mythology. The author depicts their entire world so well you can get the feeling that you live among the rabbits and see through their eyes. A wonderful book, one I have read time and time again.

Rating: 5/5 ........ 496 pages, 1972

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4 comments:

Lauren said...

Really, how can you NOT like a book about bunnies? :)

Jeane said...

But what bunnies!

Jenny said...

I feel so sad for myself for all the time I spent ignoring this book! My mother said to read it, and then said it was about a psychic bunny, and I sneerily scorned her. Stupid me; I loved it once I read it.

Jeane said...

Psychic bunny? I never thought of it that way, but I guess you could say Fiver was kind of a psychic. It's a silly thing to get hung up on, there's so much more to enjoy in the story.